RESOURCES

Audio & Video Clips
on Louisiana Traditional Culture

The following is a list of audio and video clips featured on the Folklife in Louisiana website.


AUDIO: MUSIC

 

Audio Player

'Tit galop pour Mamou performed by Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys

Written by Dewey Balfa. Flat Town Music, BMI.
From the album 'Tit galop pour Mamou. ® and © 1992 by Rounder Records,   # CD6048. Used by Permission.

Cajun Music
South Louisiana
Length of performance: 3:29


Audio Player

Zydeco sont pas salé performed by Clifton Chenier

Written by Clifton Chenier. Tradition Music, BMI, administered by Bug Music Co., BMI.
From the album Zydeco Sont Pas Salé. ® and ©, 1964 and 1997 by Arhoolie Records, # CD9001. Used by Permission.

Zydeco
South Louisiana
Length of performance:  3:12


Audio Player

Jezebel performed by The Ever Ready Gospel Singers

Traditional/public domain. Louisiana Light Studios.
From the album Union of the World. ® and © 1997 by Blue Goose Blues Records. Used by Permission.

Southland Gospel (Gospel Quartet)
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 2:50


Audio Player

Eh là bas performed by Billie and DeDe Pierce

Traditional/public domain.
From the album Gulf Coast Blues. ® and © 1971 and 2000 by Arhoolie Records, # CD488. Used by Permission.

Jazz
New Orleans
Length of performance: 3:12


Audio Player

Let's Go Get' Em performed by Bo Dollis, Monk Boudreaux and the ReBirth Brass Band

Written by Miller-Dollis-Boudreaux. Happy Valley Music, BMI.
From the album The Mardi Gras Indians Super Sunday Showdown. ® and © 1992 by Rounder Records, # CD 2113. Used by Permission.

Mardi Gras Indians
New Orleans
Length of performance: 4:47


Audio Player

Lake Charles performed by Lucinda Williams

Written by Lucinda Williams. Co-published by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Lucy Jones Music, and Nomad-Norman Music, BMI.
From the album Car Wheels On A Gravel Road. ® and © 1998 by Lost Highway Records / Mercury Records, # 314-558-338-2. Used by Permission.

Contemporary Country
South Louisiana
Length of performance: 5:26


Audio Player

Where Ever There's a Will, There's a Way performed by Ernie K-Doe

Written by Ernie K-Doe.
From the album Real Mother in Law for Ya. ® and © 2002 by Westside Records. Used by Permission.

Rhythm & Blues
New Orleans and Mississippi Delta
Length of performance: 3:48


Audio Player

Country Girl performed by Kenny Bill Stinson

Written by Kenny Bill Stinson. Southern Serenade Publishing, BMI.
From the album Inspiration. ® and © 2009 by Kenny Bill Stinson.
Used by Permission.

Rockabilly
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 5:04


Audio Player

Sunday Night in Shreveport performed by Kenny Bill Stinson

Written by Kenny Bill Stinson. Southern Serenade Publishing, BMI.
From the album Inspiration. ® and © 2001 by Kenny Bill Stinson.
Used by Permission.

Rockabilly
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 5:27


Audio Player

Rhinestones and Butterflies performed by Kenny Bill Stinson

Written by Kenny Bill Stinson. Southern Serenade Publishing, BMI.
From the album Inspiration. ® and © 2009 by Kenny Bill Stinson.
Used by Permission.

Rockabilly
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 8:31


Audio Player

Taters and Gravy and Chicken Fried Steak performed by Kenny Bill Stinson

Written and performed by Kenny Bill Stinson.
Recorded performance by Susan Roach at the Delta Music Museum in Ferriday, November 29, 2008. ® and © 2009.
Used by Permission.

Rockabilly
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 3:19


Audio Player

The Jealous Wall performed by Bill Conly

Written by Bill Conly.
From the album The Jealous Wall. ® and © by Bill Conly.
Used by Permission.

Celtic
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 3:41


Audio Player

Oh, David performed by the Original Truelight Baptist Church congregation

Traditional.
From field recording by Susan Roach
Used by Permission.

Gospel
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 18:55


Audio Player

Life of a Crab Fisherman (La vida de un jaibero) performed by Irvin Perez (lyrics)

Written by Irvin Perez.
From the album Spanish Décimas from St. Bernard Parish: Sung by Irvan Perez. ® and © 1988 Louisiana Folklife Center, # C 088. Used by Permission.

Isleño Décima
St. Bernard Parish
Length of performance: 4:38


Audio Player

Fannin Street performed by Leadbelly (Huddie Leadbetter)

Written by Huddie Leadbetter.
(Following extensive research with all due diligence, no owner of this recording has been located, and no license has been granted. Any party with conclusive claims to such ownership may contact the Louisiana Folklife Program director, Maida Owens to discuss a licensing agreement.)

North Louisiana Blues
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 2:54


Audio Player

Cotton Pickin Blues performed by Po Henry and Tookie Blues Duo

Traditional.
From field recording by Susan Roach
Used by Permission.

Blues
North Louisiana
Length of performance: :30


Audio Player

Sun's Gonna Shine performed by Henry and Tookie

Traditional. From field recording by Susan Roach. Used by Permission.

Blues
North Louisiana
Length of performance: :30


Audio Player

Wondering performed by Webb Pierce

Written by Joe Werner. ® and © 1951 by MCA Records. Used by Permission.

North Louisiana Country
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 2:58


Audio Player

It's Gone from Cornbread for Your Husband and Biscuits for Your Man: Mr. Clifford Blake, Sr. Calls the Cotton Press performed by Clifford Blake, Sr.

® © 2003, 1980 by Northwestern State University, Louisiana Folklife Center. Used by Permission.

North Louisiana Call and Response/Work Song
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 5:11


Audio Player

The Prison Bars, from The Tribute Sessions, performed by Terrance Simien on AIM Records. CD B00005KJ15.

® © 2003. Used by Permission.

South Louisiana
Length of performance: 4:38


Audio Player

Bhupali performed by Meera Seth on sitar

Field recording by Andrew McLean, 2008. Used by Permission.

Baton Rouge
Indian
Length of performance: 8:46


Audio Player

Raga Kafi performed by Priyo Majumdar on sarode

Field recording by Andrew McLean, 2008. Used by Permission.

Baton Rouge
Indian
Length of performance: 8:46


Audio Player

Opening invocation to the goddess Saraswati performed by Ramabai Shenoy

Field recording by Andrew McLean, 2008. Used by Permission.

Baton Rouge
Indian
Length of performance: 2:09


Audio Player

Barbara Allen from performed by Brownie Ford
from the CD Brownie Ford: Stories from Mountains, Swamps, & Honky-Tonks

® © Flying Fish Records, 1990. Used by Permission.

North Louisiana Cowboy Music
North Louisiana
Length of performance: 3:54


Audio Player

Arda Boyları (The Narrows of the Arda River) performed by Neslihan Hoover

Field recording by Laura Marcus Green, 2012. Used by Permission.

Baton Rouge
Turkish
Length of performance: 1:20


Audio Player

Divane Aşık (Crazy Lover) performed by Neslihan Hoover

Field recording by Laura Marcus Green, 2012. Used by Permission.

Baton Rouge
Turkish
Length of performance: 1:52


Audio Player

Kırmızı Gül Demet (A Bunch of Roses) performed by Neslihan Hoover

Field recording by Laura Marcus Green, 2012. Used by Permission.

Baton Rouge
Turkish
Length of performance: 1:40

 

AUDIO: NARRATIVE

The following essays in Delta Pieces: Northeast Louisiana Folklife include audio clips from field recordings.

Delta Folks—Ike Hamilton: From Rodeo Clown to Auctioneer Colonel

Delta Folks—Oren Russell Mississippi River Boat Pilot

Delta Folks—Helen Lyke: Passing On Family Traditions From Needlework To Stories

Delta Folks—Folk Medicine Remedies Of Virginia Roberts: “For Tummy Aches”

Delta Folks—Moses Poole on Pen Hunting in Catahoula Parish: “You've Got to Know Your Dog's Mouth”

Delta Folks—Judge Alwine Louise Smith Ragland: Louisiana's First Woman Judge

Delta Folks—Jelly Maker Maye Torrey: “Berries In The Winter”

Delta Folks—Hazel Dailey: “To Make Something Each Day That I Am Here”

Delta Folks—Lucille Stewart: Making Baptismal Gowns

Delta Folks—Horns and Dogs Just Go Together: James LeCroix's Revival of the Hunting Horn Making

Delta Folks—Blowing Horn Maker Nalda Gilmore: “The Horn Man”

Delta Folks—Hunter And Fisherman Kenneth Hebert: “Love It More Than Anything”

Delta Folks—Whitey Shockley: Mississippi River Fisherman (Audio coming)

Nets and Netmaking in the Delta

Italians in the Delta: “Pioneers of Monroe”

Flood of 1927 and the Great Depression: Two Delta Disasters, The

 

VIDEO: BELIEF

 

Houma Indian Folk Medicine

In the Louisiana bayous traiteurs heal the sick. Traiteurs, or treaters, use sacred traditional practices to identify medicinal herbs and perform healing rituals to people seeking their help. This clip demonstrates how one traiteur, Lawrence Billiot, interacts with his patients and performs certain ritual healings. Billiot learned the practice from his tribal elders when he was a child. Included in the clip are interviews with both the traiteur and his patients. A more in-depth look at traiteurs can be seen in the video, Good for What Ails You.

Taken from Good for What Ails You
Produced and Directed by Glen Pitre
Time: 3:02

VIDEO: CRAFTS

African-American Walking Stick Carving - David Allen

In this video clip David Allen demonstrates the craft of African-American walking stick carving. Allen's craft grew from a hobby of whittling towards a desire to expand his technique and use elaborate patterns. As he pursued his art, Allen gained recognition within Louisiana and the nation by attending a series of festivals and having his work displayed in a number of exhibits. Within the video Allen describes the creative process he goes through to forge one of his famous walking sticks. He speaks of how he selects the wood to how certain patterns are important and meaningful to him. Examples of Allen's work can be seen in the Creole State online Exhibit.

Edited from raw footage filmed for Louisiana Alive
Produced and Directed by: Thom Wolf for Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 5:03
1980

Anglo-American Quilting - Mattie Perkle Weldon

Quilting is a much-loved traditional practice. This clip features Mattie Perkle Weldon demonstrating and discussing quilting. Learning at a very young age, Weldon speaks about how she learned and how materials and construction have changed through the years. She also explains how she chooses a pattern, getting ideas from a picture in a magazine to sharing with a neighbor. You can read more about Louisiana quiltmaking in the article Traditional Quiltmaking in Louisiana by Susan Roach.

Taken from Louisiana Alive
Produced and Directed by Thom Wolf for Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 4:13
Filmed in 1980 in Bernice, Louisiana

Honduran Piñata Making

Argentina Colomer makes piñatas with her students. Video: Denese Neu.
Time: 1:39
Filmed in 2009.

VIDEO: CRAFTS AND MUSIC

Isleño Décimas / Boat Building

The Isleño culture of Louisiana came from the Canary Islands. This clip presents two of their traditions décimas, a traditional improvised ten line sung poetry, and boat building. This interesting culture sings of their immigration from the Canary Islands in their remarkable decimas. In the video there are several people who speak about the tradition of the décimas and the construction of an Isleño boat. To learn more about the history of the Isleños read Canary Island Settlers of Louisiana, and River of Song.

Taken from Mosquitoes and High Water (El Mosco y el Agua Alta)
View Online at: http://folkstreams.net/
Produced and Directed by Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker
Time: 3:38
Filmed in 1983 in St. Bernard

VIDEO: FOODWAYS

Cajun Crawfish: Catching, Cooking and Eating

This clip presents the ubiquitous nature of crawfish in the Louisiana landscape. There is a three part process involved in the enjoyment of crawfish: farming the crawfish, boiling the crawfish and consuming the crawfish. This example presents several people speaking about the influence of crawfish and how each process occurs. The tradition of crawfish is evident from the passed on family knowledge of farming crawfish to the eating contests and community boils.

Taken from Crawfish!
Produced and Directed by Charles Bush
Haunted Water, Fragile Land and Oh, What Tales To Tell
Directed by Glen Pitre
Produced for: Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program
1994

VIDEO: FOODWAYS AND RITUAL

Italian-American St. Joseph Day Altars

The Sicilian immigrants brought the St. Joseph Day Altar with them as they moved into Louisiana. A yearly celebration in March, the Altar is planned months in advance. Bread in a number of shapes are offered as petitions for a loved one to heal, perhaps needed at the present time or in anticipation of future needs. The clip shows a beautifully constructed altar, interviews several people about the St. Joseph Day Altar tradition, and also illustrates how the ritual is embraced by the community. For more information on Sicilian traditions read Customs, Traditions, and Folklore of a Rural, Southern Italian-American Community by Harry P. Becnel,Jr.

Taken from Island of Saints and Souls
Produced and Directed by Neil Alexander
Time: 2:14
Filmed in 1991

VIDEO: LANGUAGE

Multicultural New Orleans Language

New Orleans language is just one thing that is unique to the city's culture and lifestyle. This clip concentrates on this esoteric language and aptly displays a wide range of New Orleans lingo. The video also calls attention to the great dialect differences within the city. By listening to the language used in New Orleans, you can learn much about the culture. Also includes children's hand clapping game.

Taken from Yeah You Rite!
Produced and Directed by Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker
Time: 3:58
early 1985

VIDEO: MUSIC

Cajun Music and Dance

Walter Mouton and the Scott Playboys. Couples dance a Cajun two-step..

Taken from J'ai Été Au Bal: Cajun and Zydeco Music of Louisiana.
Directed by: Les Blank
Produced by: Brazos Films
Time: 1:05
Filmed: 1989
www.arhoolie.com

Zydeco Music and Dance

Boozoo Chavis plays for a trail ride, Clifton Chenier plays for a festival.

Taken from J'ai Été Au Bal: Cajun and Zydeco Music of Louisiana.
Directed by: Les Blank
Produced by: Brazos Films
Time: 3:08
Filmed: 1989
www.arhoolie.com

New Orleans Brass Band

Dirty Dozen Brass Band performs at a nightclub and interacts with dancers.

Taken from American Patchwork: Jazz Parades
Directed by: Alan Lomax
Produced by: Vestapol Productions
Time: 2:06
Filmed: 1990

Hilton Lytle

Hilton Lytle playing "Geriatric Blues."

Video by Susan Roach for her essay, Instrument Builder Hilton Lytle: "I've Always Worked with Wood".
Time: 2:03
Video: 2005

Zion Travelers Sing “Blind Bartimaeus”

The Zion Travelers Gospel Quartet sing “Blind Bartimaeus” at the Summer Cultural Arts SEries in Lafayette, Louisiana.

Video by Holbrook Media Productions. See Joyce Jackson's essay, Songs of Spirit and Continuity of Consciousness: African American Gospel Music in Louisiana.
Time: 3:09
Video: 1998

VIDEO: MUSIC, DANCE, AND RITUAL

Prairie Creole Music and Dance / Prairie Creole Mardi Gras

Music and Mardi Gras are at the heart of both Creole and Cajun rural culture in Louisiana. This clip presents a glimpse into this vibrant world, showing music performances and a Creole Mardi Gras traditional ritual. The music performances feature an elaborate fiddle tune and also display the pulsing rhythms of a live performance at a Dance Hall. The Mardi Gras gathering on the dusty roads culminates to the chasing of a chicken for the gumbo pot. To learn more about the rural Mardi Gras read Dance for a Chicken: The Cajun Mardi Gras by Pat Mire.

Taken from Zydeco
Produced and Directed by Nicholas R. Spitzer
Time: 2:50
1981

Mardi Gras Indians

White Eagles on Mardi Gras day in New Orleans and at rehearsal at a local club.

Taken from American Patchwork: Jazz Parades
Directed by: Alan Lomax
Produced by: Vestapol Productions
Time: 2:26
Filmed: 1990

Second-Line Dancing

Brass bands march through neighborhoods in New Orleans accompanied by impromptu solo, couple and group dancers..

Taken from American Patchwork: Jazz Parades
Directed by: Alan Lomax Produced by: Vestapol Productions
Time: 1:20
Filmed: 1990

Garifuna

Women enter Blessed Francis X. Seelos Catholic Church in New Orleans' Marigny neighborhood for a Garifuna mass.

Video by Amy Serrano for her essay, From Punta to Chumba: Garifuna Music and Dance in New Orleans. Time: 2:43
Video: 2008

VIDEO: ORAL TRADITIONS

Alligator Peach Tree

Pierre Daigle of Church Point, Louisiana, tells the tale Alligator Peach Tree at the Louisiana Folklife Festival.

Taken from Swapping Stories: Folktales of Louisiana.
Directed by: Pat Mire
Produced by: Maida Owens and Pat Mire with Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 1:38
Filmed: 1997

How the Bat Got It's Wings

Bertney Langley of Elton, Louisiana, tells the Koasati (Coushatta) tale How the Bat Got Its Wings to his family.

Taken from Swapping Stories: Folktales of Louisiana.
Directed by: Pat Mire
Produced by: Maida Owens and Pat Mire with Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 1:59
Filmed: 1997

Bouki, Lapin et Rat de Bois

Enola Matthews of Jennings, Louisiana, tells the animal tale, Bouki, Lapin et Rat de Bois (Bouki, Lapin and Possum) in Creole to Annette Huval.

Taken from Swapping Stories: Folktales of Louisiana.
Directed by: Pat Mire
Produced by: Maida Owens and Pat Mire with Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 3:11
Filmed: 1997

I'm Going to Leave You, Chère

Harry Lee LaFleur shares a joke in his barbershop in Eunice, Louisiana.

Taken from Swapping Stories: Folktales of Louisiana.
Directed by: Pat Mire
Produced by: Maida Owens and Pat Mire with Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 0:45
Filmed: 1997

Swapping Stories

A. J. Smith and Dave Petitjean of Lake Charles and Crowley, Louisiana, swap jokes at a barbeque.

Taken from Swapping Stories: Folktales of Louisiana.
Directed by: Pat Mire
Produced by: Maida Owens and Pat Mire with Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Time: 2:33
Filmed: 1997

VIDEO: RITUAL

Quinceañera

Juanita Lopez's family and friends gather for a reception after her quinceañera mass in Bernice, Louisiana.

Video by Susan Roach for her essay, Ritual Traditions of Maria Lopez: From Mexico to Louisiana. Time: 1:33
Video: 2007

New Orleans Jazz Funerals

Narrated by Milton Batiste this clip shows a Jazz Funeral progression in New Orleans. Batiste is the lead trumpet player and manager of Dejean's Olympia Brass Band. The brass band is an elemental feature in the Jazz Funeral. Although the Jazz Funeral is in constant change the celebration of death is the underlying factor. This celebration is a way to show respect and the community's important involvement of rejoicing death. This example shows the joyous celebration as Dejean's Olympia Brass Band plays and people follow behind them dancing. Milton Batiste passed away in 2001.

Taken from New Orleans Jazz Funerals from the Inside
Produced by David Jones and Milton Batiste
Directed by David Jones
Time: 1:56
1995

African-American Easter Rock Religious Service - True Light Baptist Church

This clip beautifully shows the Easter Rock ceremony. Beginning with a service the ceremony becomes more passionate, combining vocal music with rhythmic movements. The community uses symbolic colors and specific songs to celebrate Easter Rock. Everyone within the community takes part in the celebration, from singing and shouting to moving and preaching.

Edited from raw field footage
Filmed by Annie S. Staten
Time: 2:50
Filmed in 1994 at Original True Light Baptist Church

Easter Rock, Clayton, 1991

Easter Rock ceremony at Springfield Baptist Church in Clayton, 1991.

Edited from raw field footage
Filmed by Janet Sturman
Time: 2:50
Filmed: 1991

Easter Rock, Winnsboro, Songs of Spirit

Easter Rock ceremony at Truelight Baptist Church in Winnsboro, Louisiana

Edited from raw field footage
Filmed by J. Nash Porter
Time: :30
Filmed:

Easter Rock Winnsboro, 2012

Easter Rock church service in Winnsboro, Louisiana by the Truelight Baptist Church at the Princess Theater.

Edited from raw field footage
Filmed by Susan Roach
Time: 10:28
Filmed: 2012

Laotian New Year Celebration

This example of the New Year Celebration illustrates the importance of dance, music, and costume within the Laotian culture. The Laos musical tradition is almost completely oral, songs have been passed down from generation to generation. A beautiful art the classical Laotian dance derives from India, although there are several other cultural influences. This clip shows an individual and group dance during the Friday night performances. Filmed in Broussard on Easter Weekend, 2000. The Laotian subdivision is called Lanexang meaning "million elephants", the old name for Laos.

Taken from Laotian New Year 2000
Produced and Directed by Somdy Rasy
Time: 1:47
Filmed: 2000